Tuesday, 3 December 2019

Black Jack Adair

Just outside the crossroads at Ballybrittas in Laois lies Rathdaire House (Belgrove/Bellegrove) which was the family home of John George Adair, AKA "Black Jack" Adair. It was burned in 1887 but the remains are still standing and serve as a reminder of what a beautiful building it must have been in it's heyday.

Rathdaire

Adair died in 1885, presumed from dysentery in St. Louis, U.S.A. He commissioned the building of Glenveagh Castle in Donegal and was a shrewd investor and businessman building and conglomerating a huge ranch in Texas (The JA Ranch) of over 1.3 million acres which today is listed as an historic site.

Rathdaire

He is most remembered for the Derryveagh evictions from his property in Donegal where over 200 tenants were dispossessed. He was also sometimes referred to as "the most hated man in Donegal".

Rathdaire

Adair married a wealthy American widow, Cornelia Ritchie, who built the nearby (and stunning) Church of the Ascension in his memory. John George Adair is buried nearby at Lea Church of Ireland in Portarlington. 

Rathdaire - Church of the ascension.
Rathdaire

Rathdaire


Located just a little further from Rathdaire House is the Roman Catholic Church of the Sacred Heart. 

The Church was built on lands donated by one Edmund Dease M.P. and of which Adair initially opposed construction, sending several letters of objection in correspondence.

He seemed concerned that the view from his home would be disturbed but from his letters I can't seem to grasp the logic of his arguments as the Church is at least a mile away.

Edmund Dease M.P. is buried here in the Church grounds.

Rath - Church of the Sacred Heart.
Rath


John George Adair, Final Resting Place - Lea Church - Portarlington.

Lea Church



Google Maps Coordinates Rathdaire House : 
53.102331 - 7.124833 

Adair was also involved in Irelands first Sugar Beet processing factory at Mountmellick alongside famed railway engineer William Dargan in the 1850's. It only remained in operation for about 10 years.










Friday, 22 November 2019

Mass Pit

I passed a sign for Ballyquaid Mass Pit recently. I had never heard of a Mass Pit so my curiosity was piqued and I headed in the direction the sign pointed me.


A Mass Pit is just a small hollow in the ground, usually behind cover where Mass was said during Penal Law times from a point in the 1600's onward. Various laws and acts would have been in place and preceded the actual codification of the full suite of what we call today the Penal Laws.



I am led to believe that some of the very last statues involved in the whole sorry business of the Penal Laws were only abolished or revoked in the early 20th century, amazing if true...


At Ballyquaid I am presuming that when it was used as a place of worship that the hollow was deeper than it is today. The local community have erected some nice memorials and an altar with overhead shelter on the site.


It's in south Laois and very rural, well off the beaten track. Below is a Font located at the site.


The coordinates are listed below taken from Bing but work fine with Google Maps as well, keep the wheels turning.



Bing Map coordinates :  52.902561, -7.6469

Wednesday, 13 November 2019

Thorgrimr Stone

The Thorgrimr Stone is both a Runic and an Ogham Stone.

Thorgrimr Stone

It is the only known example in Ireland of a stone which contains both Scandinavian Runic and Ogham Script.

Thorgrimr Stone

The stone is located in the beautiful Saint Flannan's Cathedral in Killaloe, Clare.
Probably at least 1000 years old it is now well protected indoors for posterity and future enjoyment.

Thorgrimr Stone

There is a full page of comprehensive information in another post here :
Saint Flannan's Cathedral and Thorgrimr Stone

Thorgrimr Stone

Keep the wheels turning.............

Tuesday, 12 November 2019

Skirk Standing Stone


The backroads around Newtown Skirk are a nice area to cycle, nice and quiet with little traffic on the small Boreens.

Skirk Standing Stone


There are at least 2 Standing Stones at Skirk one of which I have visited and which is about 3 metres tall.

Skirk Standing Stone

At first glance from a distance it looks tiny because it sits in the middle of a "Henge cum Motte" surrounded by tall briars and weeds.

Skirk Standing Stone

It's well worth taking the time to have a closer look at the Stone. Funerary items and burial Urns found at the location suggest it's associated with the Bronze age.

Newtown Skirk Standing Stone

Another hidden Megalith in Laois.... With so few in the County I often wonder why Laois hasn't come up with a decent strategy and some joined up thinking with local landowners in order to better promote its more ancient prehistoric heritage.

henge at Skirk

The site where the Stone stands was initially presumed to be a Henge where rituals were held. It was later transformed into a Motte for a castle. Just 100 metres away is a medieval Church and a later 1700's Church.

Skirk Standing Stone

That's indicative of continuous human use throughout several millennia and as such would be a great area for story board interpretation. It would be nice if antiquities such at this were easily accessible to the public.




Google Coordinates below :

52°54'48.8"N 7°39'34.9"W

52.913551, -7.659705


Thursday, 7 November 2019

Clopook Standing Stone

Near the small Townland of Clopook in Laois is a Standing Stone, The Standing Stone of Clopook sometimes known as Tullamoy Standing Stone.

Clopook Standing Stone

Legend has it that the Stone was thrown from the Rock of Dunamase by a Giant who was competing against a fellow Giant to see who could hurl a stone the farthest. The stone was dropped in mid throw by the Giant and landed in Clopook where it stands today.

Standing Stone Clopook

There aren't many Megaliths or Megalithic structures in Laois that have been discovered above ground and classified though this doesn't mean that there is a lack of them, perhaps they are there and have yet to be discovered.

Giants Grave Cadamstown

In an effort to subdue rebellious and unruly areas Laois along with Offaly was "settled" in the mid 16th century by "Plantation" which involved the dispossession of local landholders, Chiefs, and figures of importance by "settlers" from England, Scotland, and Wales chiefly who were granted lands, titles, and estates.
Natives were able to avail of the disbursement of lands to those who were conquered, swore fealty, and subsequently submitted to English Crown rule, a program which had been ongoing for Centuries.

Manger Cist

This ongoing process from the time of the Tudor reign of Mary took a while however it led to huge estates being formed in Laois and subsequent large scale farming and agriculture developed. That subsequent farming and agriculture may itself be a reason why so few Megalithic sites remain or have been discovered in Laois which has extensive tract's of flat arable lands.

Manger Cist

It's possible that many small Megalithic structures have been destroyed or have been "ploughed under", into the ground in the intervening time period without landowners being aware of what they  were or represented. I don't know and this is just a supposition however looking at the scale of agriculture, and tillage in particular, this seems a likely probable cause for the lack of Megaliths in Laois.

Ballycoolan Cairn

The few I have seen are Ballycoolan Cairn, a likely Neolithic Burial Tomb (Unclassified) which needs further archaeological investigation, Manger Cist, a possible Bronze Age burial Cist (again Unclassified), The Giant's Grave at Cadamstown, which was some type of large Megalithic burial structure toppled in the search for buried treasure and the Standing Stone's of Clopook (Tullamoy) and Newtown Skirk.

Ballycoolan Cairn

All are interesting and historic relics of the County's distant prehistoric past. Most are hard to locate and some will require the permission of local landowners should you wish to gain access.

Tullamoy Clopook Standing Stone

I've posted a few photographs throughout this post of the various Megaliths mentioned and although none are on a grand scale they nevertheless belie an interpretation of the landscape of Laois from times past. Most are located in scenic and beautiful area's well off the beaten track and each is worth a visit in its own right.

Newtown Skirk Standing Stone

Traveling from place to place in the County you will doubtless pass numerous Raths, Hillforts, Mottes, Castles, Church Ruins and Abbey's.

Newtown Skirk Standing Stone

These are some of the things we often pass yet seldom see.

Keep the wheels turning.

   


Monday, 4 November 2019

Winter

Winter is here and I'm laid up (well at least laid up as in not cycling) from a bad chest infection. Fourth week now waiting on it to clear. Hopefully back cycling shortly.
   

Below are a few photo's of a solitary Mass Rock all alone in a field at Cullahill, Laois. There's a Tower House ruin, Nature Trail walk, some old Lime Kiln's, a ruined Church and a host of other things of interest hidden away in Cullahill, so it's well worth stopping if you are in the area.











Tuesday, 22 October 2019

Mass Rocks

I came across a website called Find a Mass Rock which reminded me that although I sometimes came across these antiquities I often overlooked them.

 

Below is pictured  Oughaval Mass Rock outside Stradbally in Laois, which I had just passed days earlier.

Mass Rock

It was then I realised that these places of interest which were all about evading the sanctions against freedom of worship imposed by the Penal Laws on Ireland and its inhabitants are probably much forgotten about.

Mass Rock

I'm no expert on the Penal Laws enacted in the 1600's however I do know they subjugated the population through harsh and extreme measures against practicing their religion, going to schools, property ownership, and a host of other things which today we take for granted.

Mass Rock

I recently passed a mock up of a "Hedge School" at Garrymona in Offaly and it struck me as to how difficult those times must have been for the ordinary inhabitants of Ireland.

Mass Rock

It is difficult to imagine the concept of going to school or a place of worship as being illegal.

I presume the abundance of Donkeys in Ireland was another example of the repressive laws of the time. It was illegal for a Catholic to own a Horse of good value so I guess the Irish stuck with Donkeys instead.

I imagine the ruling ascendancy feared large groups of natives on horseback or the idea that local Gaelic chiefs would be able to raise Mounted Militia's if they could own decent horses.

Mass Rock

The website Find a Mass Rock looks like a work in progress and struck me as a very good idea indeed, a way of recording the past before it disappears forever.

It's likely if you asked today what's a Mass Rock ? whats a Hedge School ? what were the Statutes of Kilkenny ? or describe the Penal Laws ? you might well get a blank look in a lot of instances...... all the more reason for documenting history while it is still around us and we can.

Keep the Wheels turning. 


Sunday, 13 October 2019

Things to see in Sligo

I've been on the indoor trainer this week not out and about cycling on the road. I ended up in County Sligo for a couple of days (without the bicycle) so rather than a full page of information I've just time to post a few photographs to whet the appetite for visiting beautiful Sligo in Ireland's North West.

Things to do in Sligo

From a Neolithic Stone Circle (remnants of a tomb) located in the most unlikely of places (a roundabout at Garravogue Villas) to the Labby Rock Portal Dolmen, Creevykeel Court Tomb or Knockrea Neolithic Cairn (Queen Maeve's Cairn).

From Carrowmore Neolithic Complex or W.B. Yeats resting place of Drumcliffe with it's High Cross and Round Tower remains to Holycross Dominican Abbey in the Town Centre, or from majestic Benbulben to Carrowkeel I'm barely scratching the surface......... 

Things to do in Sligo

It's a great place to visit with some outstanding Neolithic Sites and ancient Megaliths, some of the most important and impressive in Ireland.

Things to do in Sligo

Things to do in Sligo

The natural landscape of Sligo with it's mountains and valleys, and it's coastline on the Atlantic Ocean is wild and weather worn, sculpted throughout the millennia by time and nature.

Things to do in Sligo

Things to see in Sligo

Carrowkeel has few visitors and yet is home to around fourteen 6000 year old Passage Tombs many of which you can enter. Carrowmore is busier but easier to access.

The Labby Rock Portal Dolmen has a 70 ton Capstone and is located in a remote area behind the stunning Lough Arrow.

Creevykeel is a large Neolithic Court Tomb and in fact a comprehensive list of Neolithic sites and Megalithic structures in Sligo would be endless.

Things to see in Sligo

A huge number of impressive antiquities are scattered throughout Sligo waiting to be discovered by the visitor. Some of the more interesting or visually striking have to be sought out and lie well off the beaten track.
 
Things to see in Sligo

Things to see in Sligo

On the summit of Knocknarea any climb will be rewarded with outstanding views in every direction and the sight of Queen Maeve's Cairn, an impressively large Neolithic burial structure which although unopened is believed to be a large Passage Tomb.

Things to see in Sligo

Things to see in Sligo

Things to see in Sligo

Holycross Dominican Priory (Sligo Abbey) lies right in the heart of town and is well worth taking the time to explore.
Close by, the Abbeyquarter (Garravogue Villas) Stone Circle is very unusual just by virtue of it's location. Nearby is the old building of Sligo Gaol.

Things to see in Sligo

This is Yeat's country and his final resting place of Drumcliffe is home to a delightful little Church, High Cross, and the remnants of a Round Tower. While there and inside the Church I did notice that although there were many visitors not too many ventured inside the Church.

Do take the time to go inside if in the area, they are only too happy to encourage visitors. The Cheesecake in the Cafe here is outstanding and most of the foodstuffs looked like they were not mass produced which is commendable.

Things to see in Sligo

So that's my quick post on Sligo. I've not gone into too many specifics but half the pleasure in visiting anywhere is from finding out about it yourself and exploring hidden places off the well worn tracks.

Things to see in Sligo

Mind you, that's not to say the more well known attractions of Sligo are any less impressive but sometimes it's the peace and quiet that is an added draw to an area. Enjoy Sligo, I know I for sure did.

Knocknarea Sligo

Knocknarea Sligo

Knocknarea Sligo

Drumcliffe Sligo

A few pictures I've posted below are from Carrowkeel Neolithic Burial Complex. Alone as I wandered from Passage Tomb to Passage Tomb I was enchanted by this isolated neolithic wonderland, all the more so to have it to myself. Words cannot describe it's beauty.